MELC 196 A: Introductory Studies in Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures

Spring 2024
Meeting:
TTh 12:30pm - 1:20pm / DEN 113
SLN:
17253
Section Type:
Lecture
Instructor:
"A TASTE OF ARABIC" *** NO PREREQUISITES OR PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF ARABIC ARE REQUIRED.
Syllabus Description (from Canvas):

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This is an introductory course to the Arabic language and culture. It presents an overview of the history of the language and its main dialects, explores the interesting language structure, its unique root system, and the development of the Arabic script. It examines many fascinating aspects of the language and culture; offering a taste of the language and culture through such topics as greetings and social exchanges, Arabic holidays and celebrations, the Arabic alphabet, proverbs and sayings, diverse Arabic cuisines, and music/songs/dances.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this Arabic course, students should be able to:

  1. Greet others and respond to greetings.
  2. Ask and answer simple questions about very basic everyday life aspects.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental structure of the Arabic language.
  4. Read the Arabic sounds.
  5. Recognize the Arabic sounds in connected words.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of many aspects of the Arabic culture.

 CLASS FORMAT

Success in this course depends upon the combined efforts of the learner and the instructor/facilitator. Your responsibility is to prepare thoroughly for class at home by reading/watching any posted materials for the class, and then participate actively in class activities.

Class time will be spent primarily on activities designed to provide understanding of the fundamental structure of the language and to highlight cultural aspects through short culture presentations followed by group discussions.

ASSESSMENT FEATURES

Participation (in-class activities):                            20%

Homework assignments and discussions:             40%

Essay in English                                                        40%

Total

100%

HOMEWORK

 

Homework is based on class activities and culture presentations will be assigned weekly.

If the homework assignments require additional reading or watching videos, you will find these materials on the course website.

Essay

One short essay in English will be assigned and is due at the end of the quarter. The essay is at least two pages long and covers an aspect of the Arabic culture.

PARTICIPATION

Participation in class activities is crucial for the successful achievement of the course goals and objectives. Please come to class prepared and on time. Class starts at 12:30pm. Showing up to class late is disruptive to others and important aspects of the class can be missed.  

COURSE CONCERNS & ADDITIONAL NOTES

if you have any concerns about the class, try to resolve them first with your classroom instructor. If the matter is not resolved that way, you can turn to the Chair of the NELC Department (Prof. Naomi Sokoloff, naosok@uw.edu). If the matter is not resolved that way, there are other resources available to students to resolve complaints or grievances, including Humanities Academic Services https://hasc.washington.edu/, the Bias Reporting Tool, the Office of the Ombud, https://www.washington.edu/ombud , the University Complaint and Resolution Office, https://www.washington.edu/compliance/uciro/, and Disability Resources, https://depts.washington.edu/uwdrs/complaint-mediation/

By enrolling in this class, you make a commitment to regular and consistent class participation. Continued enrollment signifies that you have received a copy of this syllabus and that you have been notified of the requirements, and grading policies for the course, and you agree to be filmed for educational purposes. The instructor reserves the right to revise this syllabus at any time during the quarter. Students will be informed of the changes.

Use of cell phones or any other electronic devices is not allowed during class.

 

Student Conduct

The University of Washington Student Conduct Code (WAC 478-121) defines prohibited academic and behavioral conduct and describes how the University holds students accountable as they pursue their academic goals. Allegations of misconduct by students may be referred to the appropriate campus office for investigation and resolution. More information can be found online at

https://www.washington.edu/studentconduct/

Access and Accommodations

Your experience in this class is important to me. If you have already established accommodations with Disability Resources for Students (DRS), please communicate your approved accommodations to me at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs in this course.

If you have not yet established services through DRS, but have a temporary health condition or permanent disability that requires accommodations (conditions include but not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts), you are welcome to contact DRS at 206-543-8924 or uwdrs@uw.edu or disability.uw.edu.

DRS offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities and/or temporary health conditions. Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and DRS. It is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law.

Religious Accommodations

Washington state law requires that UW develop a policy for accommodation of student absences or significant hardship due to reasons of faith or conscience, or for organized religious activities. The UW’s policy, including more information about how to request an accommodation, is available at

https://registrar.washington.edu/staffandfaculty/religious-accommodations-policy/

Accommodations must be requested within the first two weeks of this course using the following link:

https://registrar.washington.edu/students/religious-accommodations-request/

TEXTBOOKS

No Textbook is required. Reading materials related to the themes of the course will be posted on Canvas.

Recommended Texts

If you are interested in reading more about the Arabic culture, the following books are recommended:

An Introduction to Modern Arabic Culture by Bassam Frangieh

Popular Culture in the Arab World: Arts, Politics, and the Media by Andrew Hammond

 

 

 

 

 ARABIC PROGRAM GRADING SCALE

%

GRADE

%

GRADE

%

GRADE

≥ 95

4.0

84

2.9

73

1.8

94

3.9

83

2.8

72

1.7

93

3.8

82

2.7

71

1.6

92

3.7

81

2.6

70

1.5

91

3.6

80

2.5

69

1.4

90

3.5

79

2.4

68

1.3

89

3.4

78

2.3

67

1.2

88

3.3

77

2.2

66

1.1

87

3.2

76

2.1

65

1.0

86

3.1

75

2.0

64

.9

85

3.0

74

1.9

63

.8

62

.7

 

Per FERPA rules, I cannot discuss grades via email. Please make an appointment to talk in my office if you have concerns.

أتمنّى لكم التوفيق والنجاح

Catalog Description:
Offered occasionally by visitors or resident faculty. Content varies.
GE Requirements Met:
Social Sciences (SSc)
Credits:
2.0
Status:
Active
Last updated:
May 27, 2024 - 9:31 am