MELC 551 A: Royal Literature in the Bible and the Ancient Near East: Rebels, Kings, and Wanderers

Winter 2024
Meeting:
MW 10:30am - 11:50am / MEB 103
SLN:
17567
Section Type:
Lecture
Joint Sections:
C LIT 496 A , MELC 351 A
Instructor:
GRADUATE SECTION OF MELC 351.
Syllabus Description (from Canvas):

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Running a band of mercenaries, building a dozen temples, or playing every musical instrument - which is the best qualification for being a king? When the Storm God and the Sea God go to war, who will become the ruler of the gods? Engage with a wide variety of ancient texts from royal inscriptions to royal myths as we explore how the peoples of the ancient Middle East thought about kingship.

Official description: Investigates kingship in the Bible and the ancient Middle East, drawing on sources from Sumer, Egypt, Babylon, Syria, Hatti, and Israel to address questions such as, “What did the peoples of this region think made a king good or bad, and how did their ideas shape how real kings presented themselves and how the ancient peoples thought about their gods?” Highlights ways in which ideas of kingship changed over time and differed between cultures. No prerequisites. 3 credits, A&H.

Syllabus draft as of 1/1/24: SYLLABUS MELC 351-551 CLIT 496.docx

 

Catalog Description:
Kingship in the Bible and ancient Near East. Draws on sources from Sumer, Egypt, Babylon, Syria, Haiti, and Israel. Highlights how ideas of kingship changed over time and differed between cultures. Recommended: MELC 201 or equivalent.
Credits:
3.0
Status:
Active
Last updated:
May 14, 2024 - 6:52 am